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BBS Scout Handbook

The British Boy Scouts & The British Girl Scouts Association
BBS Scout Badge Guide
BBS Senior Scout Training Scheme
Admission Tests And Proficiency Badges

This Handbook replaces that of the same title in the same series.

Publishing History
First Edition 1933
Second Edition September 1985
Third Edition March 1986
Fourth Edition July 1993
Fifth Edition February 1999
Sixth Edition February 2014

February 2014 ISSN 0267-4068

Navigation:

Uniform
General Conditions
Senior Scouts: British Boy Scouts (BBS)
Senior Scouts: British Girl Scouts (BGS)
Marine Scouts
Aviation Scouts
Neckerchief
Shoes
Accessories
Knives
Senior Scouts: Badges and Rank Insignia
Training Scheme: Senior Scouts
Senior Scout Admission Test
First Class
The Bushman's Thong
Seaman's Badge
Airman's Badge
Grand Scout's Crown Badge
Intructor Badge
Proficiency Badges
The Ki-Ro Badges
Appendix A Senior Scout Patrols and Colours
Ceremonies
General Policy and Regulations Applicable To Senior Scouts
Registration
Child and Young Persons Protection and Safeguarding Policies
Insurance
Leadership
Senior Scout Troop Scouters'/Officers' Titles
Leader Training
General Safety At Meetings and Out and About
Meetings
Finance
Membership and Age Range
General Uniform Badges All Sections
Co-Operation between Sections
Co-Operation with Other Organisations
Church Parades
Programmes

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Uniform

General Conditions

In the description of uniform 'Scout Colours' refers to the traditional colours of Khaki, Navy Blue, Green or Grey.

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Scouts: British Boy Scouts (BBS)

Senior Scout uniform

Pictures of the uniform and further information may be found on the uniform page,

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Scouts: British Girl Scouts (BGS)

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Marine Scouts

As British Boy Scouts and British Girl Scouts with the following variations:

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Aviation Scouts

As British Boy Scouts and British Girl Scouts with the following variations:

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Neckerchief

Scouters/Officers when they are with their Group shall wear the neckerchief of the Scout Group.

When Scouter/Officers are not with their Group or Company they may wear either their Scout Group neckerchief or the 'Order of World Scout' neckerchief for those holding the 'Wood Badge' issued by the 'Order of World Scouts'.

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Shoes

Shoes must be of appropriate colour and must be standard within a section selected from black or brown.

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Accessories

Appropriate accessories can be worn or carried suitable to any given occasion:

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Knives

Sheath Knives, must not be worn in public places, other than at Camp and as part of the Uniform.

Folding Pocket Knives may be carried at any time, provided the blade does not exceed 8cm (3 inches). Pocket Knives with longer blades must not be carried in public places.

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Senior Scouts: Badges and Rank Insignia

A Senior Scout wears the following badges:

In Uniform a cloth badge with the letters BBS or BGS superimposed in red on a white arrow with a black ground, worn mid-point between elbow and shoulder of the right sleeve; A cloth badge with a white 'Peace Lily' Fleur-de-lys on a blue background or a 'Red Fluer-de-lys' at the discretion of the Scout Group but must be consistent throughout worn on the left breast of the shirt or blouse.

A Patrol Seconder wears in addition, on the left breast of the shirt or blouse, one stripe of Maroon braid, 15mm wide and 8cm long, on the right hand side of the Fleur-de-lys badge.

A Patrol Leader wears two stripes of Maroon braid as above either side of the Fleur-de-lys badge.

A Troop Leader wears three stripes of Maroon braid, with the third stripe behind the Fleur-de-lys badge.

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Senior Scout Admission Test

Before being invested as a Senior Scout he/she must either hold the First Class badge or complete the Initial Test to the satisfaction of his/her Scouter/ Officer as follows:

  1. Understand the Scout Pledge/Promise and Scout Law in accordance with his or her age and development.
  2. Pass or re-pass the Tenderfoot and Second Class tests.
  3. Hike or row a boat, with other Senior Scouts, a distance of 8 miles (13 kilometres). He/she need not necessarily camp for the night, but must carry a pack properly packed by him/herself, erect a tent, light a fire, and cook a meal for him/herself and his/her companion; and on his/her return he/she must give a verbal report to the Troop or Patrol. The following regulations will be observed;
    • (a) Homebase. There must be a homebase, to which the Scouts can make telephone contact during the journey, and a journey Supervisor appointed, who must be in the vicinity of the journey, to ensure the safety of the Group.
    • (b) Numbers. A minimum of 4 Scouts and a maximum of 7 Scouts, must undertake the journey. It is not necessary for all the group to be under assessment, but all must be properly equipped and be capable of undertaking the journey. Each Scout taking the test, will report independently.

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First Class

First Class

Before being awarded the First Class badge, a Scout must hold the Second Class badge (or have completed the Senior Scout Admission test), and pass the following tests:

  1. Have camped, as a Scout, for a total of 10 nights before completing his/her first class tests. One weekend camp, at least, must be included in the total.
  2. Demonstrate the proper method of dealing with the following emergencies: fire, drowning, ice-breaking and electric shock.
  3. Know the position of the main arteries and how to stop external bleeding from veins and arteries. Demonstrate how to deal with a fracture of the collar bone.
  4. Understand the importance of immobilising a fracture limb and the importance of not moving other suspected fractures. Demonstrate the use of the Triangular bandage as applied to the knee, head, and foot. Demonstrate how to deal with shock.
    Note: A Scout who has gained the First Aid Badge will be deemed to have passed this test.
  5. Swim 50 metres (50 yards) unassisted any style. If a Doctor certifies that bathing is dangerous to a person's health, the latter must, instead of this, pass one of the other badges: For Scouts under 15, Camper, Jobman, Woodcraftsman, Backwoodsman, Stalker or Starman.For Scouts over 15, Camp Warden, Handyman, Naturalist, Senior Pioneer, Tracker or Astronomer. The S.M. may allow a Scout to gain the First Class badge without passing the swimming test, provided he is satisfied that it is not practicable for the Scout to obtain facilities for learning to swim, and that the Scout gains the alternative badge as in the case of those holding a doctor's certificate. The Scout should make every effort to pass the swimming test as soon as possible.
  6. Read the meaning of a series of simple tracks made in sandy or other suitable ground. These should include running, limping, carry a weight, walking backwards, and blind gaits.
  7. Be able to recognise and name, from lists submitted by the Scout, 12 common trees and 6 common birds.
  8. Using improvised apparatus, such as a Scout staff, estimate three distances not more than half-a-mile (800m), and three heights not more than 30m (100 feet). In each case the estimate to be within ten per cent error above or below the actual.
  9. Demonstrate the following: sheerlashing, back and eyesplice, fireman's chair knot, manharness knot, rolling hitch.
  10. Use a felling axe for felling or trimming light timber, or, if this is impracticable, be able to log up a piece of timber and demonstrate the theory of felling a tree, and use a bush or cross-cut saw. Demonstrate the care and maintenance of an axe.
  11. Read and be able to use a 1:50,000 Ordnance Survey map (or its local equivalent). Use a compass. Point out a compass direction by day or night without the aid of a compass.
  12. Re-pass the Second Class badge tests 1-10 inclusive. This test will be taken next to last.
  13. Go on foot, with another Scout or up to two other Scouts, a 24 hour journey of at least 14 miles (22.5km). In the course of the journey the Scouts must cook their own meals, one of which must include meat, over a wood fire in the open; find their camp site and camp for the night. The Scouts must carry out any instructions given by the Assessor as to things to be observed en route and those under Assessment make a log of their journey sufficient to show they have carried out those instructions.
    The Scouts may do this journey partly by water and partly be land - at least 5 miles (8km) of the 14 to be done on foot.
    This test will be taken last, and the following regulations will be observed
    • (a) Equipment. Clothing, footwear and equipment should be suitable for the activity and the environment in which it is to be used and generally conforms to current accepted practice. The equipment must be capable of resisting the worst weather for, in the event of a serious deterioration in conditions, safety may well depend on it being able to withstand the prevailing conditions.
    • (b) Personal Emergency Equipment. The following equipment must be carried; Map(s), Compass, Watch, Torch, First Aid Kit, Whistle, Coins for the telephone, Notebook and pencil, Spare Pullover and a Waterproof Jacket or Coat. If the Journey is in Wild Country, the following additions must be carried; A Bivvy/Survival Bag, Matches, Emergency rations, Extra Warm Clothing, Spare bulb and batteries for the torch. The weight of personal gear carried by members of the group must not exceed one quarter of their body weight.
    • (c) Training and Practice Journeys. Training in safety procedures, First Aid, navigation, campcraft, country code, observation and recording must take place in addition to the skills required by the method of journeying and the environment in which the venture is taking place. Prior to the qualifying venture, all participants are required to carry out practice journeys which may be accompanied by adults. These do not need to be of the same duration, or in the same area of the venture, but the conditions need to be similar. Practice Journeys should include one or more nights of camping.
    • (d) Homebase. There must be a homebase, to which the Scouts can make telephone contact during the journey, and a journey Supervisor appointed, who must be in the vicinity of the journey, to ensure the safety of the Group. The Supervisor should make daily contact with the Group.
    • (e) Numbers. A minimum of 2 Scouts and a maximum of 3 Scouts, must undertake the journey. It is not necessary for all the group to be under assessment, but all must be properly equipped and be capable of undertaking the journey. Each Scout taking the test, will report independently.
    • (f) Planning. This should be a well thought out and carefully planned activity approved by the Scouter/ Officer. A Route Card for each day must be filled in, containing distances, timings, check points, and in wild country, alternative bad weather routes and escape routes for each leg (i.e. civilisation, or a road, or regular footpath). A copy of the Route Card, along with a tracing of the route, on good quality tracing paper, or marked on a photocopy of the map being used, this must be supplied to both the homebase and to the Journey Supervisor. The Route Card and Map Tracing will enable any rescue team to locate the group quickly if any emergency occurs.

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The Bushman's Thong

A leather thong, worn on the right shoulder.

First Class

Before being awarded the Bushman's Thong, a Scout must:

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Seaman's Badge

Before being awarded the Seaman's Badge, which is worn on the right arm, a Scout must hold the First Class Badge, the Venturer badge and two of the following badges; Boatswain, Helmsman, Fisherman, Naturalist, Meteorologist, Astronomer, Master Canoeist, of which either the Boatswain or Helmsman is obligatory.

Airman's Badge

Before being awarded the Airman's Badge, which is worn on the right arm, a Scout must hold the First Class Badge, the Venturer badge and two of the following badges; Air Mechanic, Air Navigator, Glider Pilot, Hiker, Master Cook, Meteorologist, Naturalist, Astronomer,of which either the Air Mechanic or Air Navigator is obligatory.

Note 1. The Bushman's Thong, Seaman's badge and Airman's badge are alternatives, and only one may be worn.

Note 2. The Seaman's and Airman's badges are not restricted to Marine and Aviation Scouts respectively.

Note 3. On production of a Doctor's certificate to the effect that a Venturer badge tests would be dangerous to a Senior Scouts health or physically impossible, the holding of the Venturer badge will not be obligatory. The appropriate Commissioner, however must satisfy themselves that the Senior Scout shows the qualities which would enable them, but for his handicap, to pass the Venturer badge tests. The Senior Scout must instead pass a third badge from the selected badges list above.

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Grand Scout's Crown Badge

Scout Crown

The Grand Scout has been graciously pleased to authorise the issue of a special certificate to Senior Scouts or Scouts over 15 years of age, who have gained the Grand Scout's Badge. The badge is awarded to one who, having thoroughly trained themselves in Scoutcraft, places that training at the disposal of the community for public service.

Before being awarded the Grand Scout's Crown Badge, which is worn on the left arm, a Scout must:

  1. Hold the Bushman's Thong (or Seaman's or Airman's badge) and four of the Senior Scout public service badges of which Ambulance is obligatory.
  2. At any time after their 15th. birthday and after becoming a First Class Scout, have carried out approved service to the community. The proposed service should be approved by the Group Scout Master, who may consult any authority concerned. Service may be done within the Scout Movement (such as Senior Scout Instructor; working with Handicapped Scouts, etc.) or outside it (such as Sunday School Teacher; Hospital service; Emergency service, etc.). A certificate to the effect that this service has been carried out satisfactorily should be obtained by the Senior Scout from the Unit concerned, such as Vicar, Matron, Cub Master, etc., and countersigned by their Group Scout Master. The minimum duration of qualifying service is 24 working hours, either as regular service spread over 6 months or on a short-term project.
  3. In the opinion of t he Group Council be setting a personal example of the Scout way of life.
  4. Have had an interview with a GHQ Commissioner or other nominated person appointed for the purpose.

A Senior Scout will receive their Certificate if they so desire at a reception provided at intervals by the Grand Scout.

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Senior Instructors Badge

Instructors Badge

The Senior Instructors Badge is worn on the right breast above the line of the pocket. Before being awarded the Senior Instructors Badge, the Senior Scout must:-

  1. Hold the Bushman's Thong or Marine Scout Badge or Aviation Badge.
  2. Have shown the qualities of leadership and a desire to use these qualities, together with his/her Scout knowledge, to the benefit of a lower section.
  3. With the approval of the Senior Scout Master or Group Scout Master, have completed a probationary period of one month, and be prepared to continue, as an instructor to a lower section to the satisfaction of the Scouter/ Officer concerned.
  4. In the case of Wolf Cubs, the Senior Scout must:-
    • (a) Have a knowledge of, and ability to instruct in the subjects of the First and Second Stars tests and any two proficiency badges.
    • (b) Show a reasonable knowledge of the Wolf Cub Manual.
    • (c) Know the duties of the Cub Master and other Scouters/Officers and the difference between the Wolf Cub and Scout training methods.
  • In the case of Beaver sections, the Senior Scout must:-
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    Proficiency Badges

    The following Proficiency Badges may be earned by Senior Scouts/Scouts over 15:

    Aircraft Constructor; Air Mechanic; Air Navigator; Air Observer; Ambulance; Archaeologist; Artist; Astronomer; Bible Knowledge; Boatswain; Bookman; Camp Warden; Cave Explorer; Civics *; Conservationist *; Despatch Rider *; Electrician; Farmer; Fireman *; Fisherman; Forester; Glider Pilot; Handicraft; Handyman *; Master Helmsman; Hiker; Horseman; Horticulturist; Interpreter *; Leading Piper; Leading Signaller *; Map Maker; Master Canoeist; Master Cook; Master Swimmer; Mechanic; Meteorologist; Mountaineer; Musician; Naturalist; Orator; Pathfinder *; Philatelist; Pilot *; Public Health *; Quartermaster; Radio Technician; Rescuer *; Rock Climber; Senior Athlete; Senior Bellringer; Senior Explorer; Senior Scout Circle; Senior Photographer; Senior Pioneer; Skier; Tracker; Venturer; World Friendship.

    More information on Proficiency Badges may be found here

    Proficiency badges marked thus * are public service badges.

    Syllabi for all the above badges are available on request from GHQ.

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    Method of Wearing

    Badge positions are shown in detail on the uniform badge position page

    Proficiency badges are worn on the right arm in parallel rows between the shoulder and elbow below and above the BBS or BGS membership badge, except as follows:

    1. The First Class badge is worn on the left arm between the shoulder and elbow.
    2. The Ambulance badge is the only badge worn on both arms. It must be the uppermost proficiency badge, whenever gained.
    3. Public service badges will be worn on the left arm with the Ambulance badge at the top. The public service badges are as follows (Over 15):-
      • Air Observer
      • Ambulance
      • Civics
      • Conservation
      • Despatch Rider
      • Fireman
      • Handyman
      • Interpreter
      • Leading Signalman
      • Pathfinder
      • Pilot
      • Public Health
      • Rescuer
    4. The Bushman's Thong is worn round the right shoulder and replaces the Scout Cord.
    5. The Seaman's Badge is worn in the centre of the right arm.
    6. The Airman's Badge is worn in the centre of the right arm.
    7. The Grand Scout's Crown is worn on the left arm above the First Class badge and surrounded by the qualifying public service badges.
    8. If any Ambulance Association's First Aid badge has been gained, this may be worn instead of the Ambulance Badge and is worn uppermost on the left shoulder.
    9. Swimming badges or Life Saving badges may be worn on the right sleeve just above the elbow. Only one badge may be worn, usually the highest award.

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    The Ki-Ro Badges

    Information about the Ki-Ro badge may be found here

    The Ki-Ro Badge

    The Scout Ki-Ro Badge Grade 1

    The Scout Ki-Ro Badge Grade 2

    The Scout Ki-Ro Badge Grade 3

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    Appendix A, Senior Scout Patrol Names and Colours

    Senior Scout Patrols

    Senior Scouts replace the Scout shoulder knot with a shoulder patch (3.5cms square) of two colours divided diagonally. The diagonal division to run from the top right hand corner to the bottom left hand corner. The patch is worn on the left shoulder as the top most badge. The first colour listed is the colour nearest to the front of the shoulder. Patrols as follows;

    Senior Scout Patrol Names and Colours

    The names given to patrols are those of previous Grand Scouts of The Brotherhood of British Scouts. Senior Scouts should research the Grand Scout that their Patrol is named after.

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    Ceremonies

    Please click here for more information

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    General Policy and Regulations Applicable To Scouts

    Registration

    A Senior Scout Troop must form part of a BBS Scout Group, and the Scout Group must register the Senior Scout Troop under their Scout Group Registration, as for all Sections. The Scout Troop Scouters/Officers must apply for the appropriate warrant for their rank, the forms for which are available from the Group Scout Master or from the BBS Headquarters. Please note that a Scout Troop may be permitted to be formed in advance of a full Scout Group being established with the approval of the BBS Headquarters.

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    Child and Young Persons Protection and Safeguarding Policies

    The Association's policies and procedure for these are obtainable on request from the BBS Headquarters. All warranted Scouters/Officers will need to complete forms relating to these policies and undergo checks to ensure that the Association policies are being fully complied with.

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    Insurance

    The Scout Group is responsible for their own Public Liability and any Personal Injury insurance that must be in line with the BBS Headquarters' requirements in order to qualify for registration of the Association.

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    Leadership

    The ranks for leaders follow similar to those in the other Sections of the Scout Group and are all warranted posts, in order of rank is the 'Senior Scout Master' (SSM) or 'Lady Senior Scout Master' (SSM), then the assistants referred to as 'Assistant Senior Scout Master' (ASSM) or 'Lady Assistant Senior Scout Master' (ASSM).

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    Senior Scout Troop Scouters'/Officers' Titles

    The titles or names for the Senior Scout Scouters/Officers are traditionally taken from Naval Ranking. Therefore the name 'SKIP' must be used for the Senior Scout Master. Names for Assistant Senior Scout Masters and any adult helpers will be left to the discretion of the Section concerned, but the names that can be selected from are: 'BOSUN'; 'ENSIGN'; 'PURSER'; 'GUNNER'; 'STITCHY'; 'CHIPPY'; 'SPARKY'; 'MIDSHIPS' as typical examples. These names are also used in the Scout Section so if possible avoid the names already adopted in that Section apart from 'SKIP'.

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    Leader Training

    The training of Scout Troop Scouters/Officers follows the same course as for all other Sections, consisting of a 'Preliminary Training Course' (PTC) that will probably be carried out over a weekend, or two day sessions or maybe several evening sessions. At the end of the course a Certificate will be issued and a two-stranded Turk's Head Woggle will be presented.

    After completing the PTC comes the 'Part 1 Correspondence Element' consisting of three Studies, each Study consisting of questions to which you, as the Candidates, will have to find the answers by either reading or in discussion groups with others. Each Study will be checked by a Reader appointed for that purpose and then the next Study can be undertaken. On completion of the Correspondence Element a further Certificate will be issued.

    Following this will be the 'Part 2 Practical Residential Course' over a long weekend or several short weekends, in which the practical skills of Scouting will be presented. A further Certificate will be issued on Completion of 'Part 2'.

    'Part 3 Probationary Period', a probationary period usually of around three months will then take place, after which a report will be submitted by the Group Scout Master, on the suitability of the candidate in putting into practice what has been learned during the 'Wood Badge Training'.

    When a recommendation as to the suitability has been received by the Trainers, a further Certificate will be issued, together with the 'Wood Badge' insignia proper and the 'Order of World Scouts' Wood Badge neckerchief.

    Whilst the above is not compulsory, it is hoped that all Scouters/Officers will want to become as proficient as possible and will undertake that training. We can all benefit from an exchange of ideas which is inevitably a product of such training.

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    General Safety At Meetings and Out and About

    Safety in the Troop Meetings - Where there are boisterous games it is necessary to remove out of harm's way all things that are likely to cause injury, e.g. tables and chairs, ropes and other equipment not required for that game and especially sharp or pointed objects. Look out for things likely to lead to accidents.

    Safety on the Road - The 'Green Cross Code' is an essential part of our Scouting programme and all Scouts should be made well aware of this and be putting this into practice on all outdoor activities and expeditions. This is particularly important if a Patrol or Troop have a need to cross or walk along a road. Other applicable part of the Highway Code must also be learned and put into practice when appropriate, particularly the sections applicable to pedestrians and cyclist.

    First Aid - All Scout Troops should have to immediate hand a comprehensive First Aid Kit. This should contain the normal requirements items for dealing with cuts and scratches, grazes and bruises. In addition a small note book to record any details of injuries sustained and the treatment given and by whom, along with the name of the Scout, the date and time and finally the location. A current edition of the First Aid Manual issued by the British Red Cross or similar authority must be kept in the First Aid Kit.

    Any head injury which appears to have concussed the injured person should be dealt with at the nearest hospital.

    Wherever possible one of the Scouters/Officers in the Scout Troop should be trained in First Aid and preferably hold a valid STA 'Activity First Aid' and 'Emergency First Aid Ay Work' Certificate, or have attended a First Aid Course offered by the British Red Cross or similar authority to the same level.

    On all outings carry a First Aid Kit.

    If You Are Not Equipped To Deal With A Specific Incident, Get Someone Who Can.

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    Meetings

    Senior Scout meetings should be arranged to suit the age group. Meeting lengths of time are flexible for this Section, but normally they will last approximately two hours, and of course as much as possible within the programme should be arranged for outdoor activities. It is advisable that a Senior Scout Council meeting should be held at regular intervals. This is an informal meeting of the Troop Scouters/Officers with any other adults working with the Section, to discuss programmes and activities.

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    Finance

    Membership subscriptions should be levied on the individual Scouts. This should be determined by the Group Scout Master in consultation with the Scout Master and should be a reasonable amount, bearing in mind local conditions and expenses incurred in running the Scout Troop as a part of the Scout Group. The monies must be properly accounted for and banked with the Scout Group Treasurer, and the monies expended at the discretion of the Group Scout Master in consultation with the Scout Master. A float could be issued for the Scout Master's accountable cash purchases for the Scout Troop.

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    Membership and Age Range

    Both Boys and Girls are eligible to join this Section when they have attained the age of 15 years. They transfer to the Rover Scouts when they have achieved the age of 18 years or undertake a role as an assistant Scouter/Officer in one of the Sections within their Scout Group, or of course the can become both a Rover Scout and an Assistant Scouter/Officer, fully fulfilling both roles.

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    General Uniform Badges All Sections

    BBS and BGS Arrow Badges - Two of these Association badges are worn, one on the right breast of the jersey and one on the right arm at the same height as the breast badge.

    Scout Group Nametape - The Scout Group nametape is worn at the top of the right arm shoulder of the jersey, following the shoulder seam around.

    Order Of World Scouts Badge - This badge is worn on the right breast of the jersey just below the BBS and BGS Arrow badge. This badge is the badge worn by all members of the international 'Order of World Scouts' (OWS), the international membership badge.

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    Co-Operation between Sections

    The Scout Troop cannot exist in isolation as it is, nor should be, it must be a Section of a Scout Group (unless a new group just forming with Scouts only to start with). There must be contact and interactions with the Beavers, Wolf Cub Pack and the Senior Scout Troop on regular occasions to show a good Scouting example to the younger Sections, as well as knowing other Section Scouters/Officers and members of other Sections that they are members of a family in Scouting. Combined activities are very important and all Scouts should fully support these that may be organised by the Scout Group, such joint activities as parades; hikes; parent and members games; fetes and fund raising; Christmas parties, etc.

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    Co-Operation with Other Organisations

    Joint activities with young persons of comparable ages in other organisations such as the Guides and other associations' Scout Sections, Church youth groups, or competitions with school teams are to be encouraged. As our aim is the promotion of our Scouting and all it stands for, and to be seen taking a useful role in community activities and society, we must therefore participate in outside activities and fully support these activities; and not permit the membership to be lukewarm in their participation of these joint or share activities, thereby letting the Scout Group down.

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    Church Parades

    We are principally a Christian Scout Association as such Church Parades and attendance at one's own Church is an essential element for Scouting, embedded in its Scout Promise/Pledge and Scout Law. Therefore Scouts must be encouraged to fully participate in all the Scout Group Church Parades, particularly the St. George's Day Church Parade where the Scouts re-affirm their Scout Pledge/Promise and Scout Law. Monthly Church Parades are recommended in order to fulfil the important elements within the Scout Pledge/Promise and Scout Law with minimum attendance targets set for members. Scouts should take pride in supporting all Church Parades, the marching, the Hymn singing, the pride in being seen in uniform and carrying their Section flag, thereby reinforcing their part played in the family of Scouting. And of course other young people see them and want to join.

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    Programmes

    The programme of activities should be appropriate to the 10.5 and 15 year olds and for both boys and girls, particularly in mixed meetings. As well as outdoor activities the programme should consist of, amongst other things, games with a purpose to promote character building and self-reliance, a sense of duty to others, fun, sportsmanship and interest in the outdoors. Sample programmes can be obtained from the BBS Headquarters on request.

    Note: Scout Troop Progress Charts (A3 Display Charts For Wall Hanging) Can Be Obtained From The BBS Headquarters On Request.

    We trust that this handbook will be found of great assistance, any questions or requests for further information, please contact the BBS Headquaters.

    Wishing You a Great Scouting Future.

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